Positive Reasons For Studying Engineering at University

Positive Reasons For Studying Engineering at University

Engineering is one of the subjects that at first seems very practical and practical. And indeed true! But it also requires a lot of academic skills and technical knowledge as well, which makes the engineering industry very profitable. Engineering must, therefore, be considered as a very important and challenging subject to be studied, and which, if studied well, can lead to good work with great potential for remuneration.

Lots of Different Activities and Skill Areas

Within the realms of the engineering industry, there are lots of different activities and skill areas that you can pursue, and not all of them actually require you to have solely studied Engineering at University. Jobs in fields such as research, development, design, manufacturing, and operation of products and services are all available within the world of engineering. Having a solid academic background in these areas, or having undertaken a study that allows you to demonstrate how you have these skills is the perfect way to get into the engineering industry. You’ll find that the jobs available within this field are intellectually stimulating, pressurized and challenging, delivery-focused and thus ultimately provide a real sense of satisfaction.

Higher Chance of The Securing Job

Another solid reason for studying Engineering is that the chances of you securing a job after University are high, as demand for good engineers is high in practically every country in the world. Indeed, unemployment amongst professional engineers, even during this time of recession, is lower than almost any other profession.

A Vast Number of Career Opportunities

Furthermore, you don’t have to go on and pursue a role that is specifically in Engineering after the completion of your Engineering degree. Studying Engineering at University can lead to a vast number of career opportunities in other sectors and industries including; electrical, civil, marine, chemical, software design and implementation, systems, information, communication, and manufacturing. Again, within each of these sectors, there are job opportunities in research, design, development, and tests, as well as management, production, marketing and sales. And research shows that individuals with an academic background in Engineering seem to be very successful. Indeed, professional engineers have a better chance of becoming chief executives than other professions; they outnumber accountants three to one!

Further Education

Interestingly, earning a bachelor’s degree in Engineering seems to direct individuals toward higher and further education. There is a real trend in further education statistics which shows that students with an Engineering degree seem to be successful in pursuing further educational opportunities. So your student days don’t have to end at the completion of your degree. If you think that you fancy continuing with your educational study by pursuing a Masters Qualification or even a Ph.D., having an undergraduate degree in Engineering will set you up perfectly.

Engineering World

The engineering world is very interesting, fast-moving, dynamic and moving. New materials, technologies, and processes are being developed all the time. Pair this with the increasing globalization of engineering and the fact that there is always a new market on …

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Admission to Higher Education in Private Higher Education

Admission to Higher Education in Private Higher Education

Admission to private tertiary institutions is usually very selective and high level commitment is usually expected from GCSE and A-level students; However, this allows independent tertiary institutions to maintain high standards, so they can offer their students a stimulating environment that is conducive to achieving the best grades and earning acceptance at the best universities in the UK, such as Oxford and Cambridge.

Students who want to get a place at a private tertiary institution to prepare for the sixth level / level A and the GCSE exam will usually be asked to fill out an application form. In addition, they will be asked to provide copies of the latest academic reports, or predictions of GCSE scores. For A-level or GCSE students abroad, a personal statement describing students’ achievements, interests and ambitions regarding further education can also be requested.

Students will then be asked to attend an interview; for some A-level subjects, acceptance tests may also be required, such as auditions for drama students. Interviews for places in independent tertiary education higher education are usually held in tertiary institutions; however, for overseas students who wish to apply for a place at a private tertiary institution in the UK, interviews can be conducted in the student’s country of residence or by telephone. This interview focuses on the ambitions and interests of A-level or GCSE students, not only about the academic curriculum, but also beyond. In interviewing students, the goal of the college staff is to determine that students have and will be able to achieve above-average grades.

Open Days or Open Evenings are often offered by universities to improve the education of students and their parents. At this meeting, parents and students have the opportunity to meet with teachers and college staff and to attend presentations and exhibitions of student work. This allows them to experience the activities offered by independent tertiary institutions they are considering registering.

A wide range of courses in all A-level subjects are usually available at private higher education colleges: arts and media, finance and computing, humanities, languages, social sciences and traditional sciences. At the GCSE level, courses are available in core subjects (mathematics, science, English literature, English and ICT) as well as subjects such as arts and languages.

In addition, revised exam courses can be offered during the Easter period for GCSE and A-level students.

Private tertiary institutions for GCSE and A-level preparation usually provide additional services for their students. For example, classes and tutorials are held in smaller groups; this makes it possible to give GCSE and A-level students more individual attention as well as a more stimulating and interactive environment, with the aim of enhancing their learning abilities and skills. For example, at Ashbourne College, an independent A-level and further education college in Kensington, Central London, group sizes rarely exceed ten. In addition, advanced private universities usually offer a large choice of facilities (such as computers, media or art equipment) as well as various extracurricular activities for their students, such as sports, cultural visits …

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Adult Education As a Key to Improving Your Situation

Adult Education As a Key to Improving Your Situation

The world is still feeling the effects of the global financial crisis as tens of thousands of people in the developed economy have been left without a job. And while we wait for a recovery, a new study about adult education in Ireland suggests that flexible learning could be the key to improving your situation during the recession.

Over the past thirty years, education reform has transformed higher education in Ireland by making it more accessible for the general public. During this time, the needs of adult students have also dramatically changed. In order to remain relevant, institutes offering adult education in Ireland have been forced to adapt in order to become more flexible to cater for the needs of their students.

Educational institutions that offer flexible part-time courses provide adults who want to further their education with real opportunities for increased choice, convenience and personalisation when it comes to their studies. This allows the learner to choose when, where and how learning occurs. Flexible learning also recognises that different students have different learning preferences and requirements based on their unique circumstances.

Why do adults in Ireland choose Further Education?:

There are many reasons why more adults are choosing to further their education by signing up for flexible part time courses at various educational institutes throughout Ireland. Some have turned to adult learning as a way to upskill and stand out in a competitive job market after losing their job due to the current economic climate. Other students might still have their jobs but want to gain additional skills in order to become more valuable to their organisation. In other cases students may still have their jobs but are unhappy in their current career. In this situation, adult education provides them with the ability to acquire new skills to improve their lives without losing their monthly income.

If you are an adult who is interested in furthering your education, here is a bit of advice to help you on your way:

Make sure you have enough time to dedicate to your studies:

Whether you are a stay-at-home mum or have a full-time job, you’ll be able to find a variety of part-time and full-time courses suited to your lifestyle.

Do your research:

Start by searching the web to find institutions in your area that offer the courses that interest you.

See education as an investment:

Most courses are not free but the price of admission is well worth it if a course can help you further your career or break into a new industry or profession..

There has never been a greater need for adult education and the availability of flexible learning has been a priority for policy makers and those involved in. If adult education can make an important difference to Ireland as a whole, it can certainly make a positive impact on your own lifestyle too.…

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Education is Strength, Education is Opportunity - He said

Education is Strength, Education is Opportunity – He said

One day I found an attractive man sitting and drinking coffee at Starbucks; we talked about the stupidity and challenges of various people on Wall Street and in our political leadership, and he couldn’t say enough spiteful things about Republicans in Washington DC, and people on Wall Street, claiming that they were the ones who robbed people of their opportunities people to work for living wage and be successful in life. Then he made blanket statement that:

“Education is Strength, It’s Opportunity.”

Well, I think I completely disagree. Not because knowledge is unnecessary or that education is “way” or perceived way to get that knowledge, nor is it the fact that solid education will definitely help on resumes for certain types of job positions, sure it’s quite true, at least in our period now, however, one can also say, well I would specifically say that:

“Higher Education and Student Loans, Towards Economic Slavery,” or that “Higher Education has Introduced So Much Political Accuracy into Our Society that Basically Pirates the American Way of Life,” and see the results today, right now. Is this good enough? Is this the best and “final” answer to advanced and modern civilizations? Student loans of $ 100,000 or more, and textbooks of more than $ 250 per year for information that you can get in free online lectures, or from WikiPedia?

Furthermore, I will tell you that because the ratio of job applications for open positions is very high, many employers need more substantial education, not because they need it but to shorten the pile of resumes. This results in artificial demand for higher education, and because we allow students to borrow money for higher education, it inflates the bubble, thereby increasing costs – but to no avail, those who have lot of education, will only have more debt in the future – By therefore, forced to work to pay it back.

“Economic Slavery as an Opportunity Through Education?” Really, do you think so?

Furthermore, and I can say this as an entrepreneur who leaves school to run my own company, it seems to me that higher education in many ways only causes linear thinking and the highest adherence to prospective employers, so it really is like “training dogs “and human domestication as whole in the exchange of bones, or in this case higher salary?

And still, it comes with dog collar and student loan debt chain, with taxpayers picking up dirt when the loan fails or the dogs forget? Please consider all of this and if I offend you, overcome it, you are good puppy, you can handle it.…

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Education in Our Networked Future

Education in Our Networked Future

As we enter the Connected Age, our education systems are increasingly falling short. We have carefully crafted and refined the education system, schools, vocational colleges and secular universities, but they are edifices of different age.

There are three reasons why I say so.

First, we have moved from time of information scarcity to information abundance. Today’s challenge is not to access information, but to check its credential and to be able to use it in context. But our prescriptive education is mostly about ‘knowing’ things rather than ‘discovery’. The school system is designed to discourage inventiveness and questioning. The students are still required to write memorized answers rather than Googling the facts and building independent or collaborative coursework.

Moreover, the education system today is built as Value Chain systems. The focus is on the Process, and the whole ideis to add value to student who turns up at the beginning of the semester so that she can meet the end-Semester requirements. But such standardized processes are, by definition, inflexible to accommodate diverse learning preferences of individuals. The mass produced education also discriminates against niche subjects and special interests. This education system fails to meet its societal need – because making accountants out of artists does not sound like smart ideany more.

Finally, today’s learners come to college after seeing computer at home for their entire lifetime, having their mobile phones since their school days and most, if not all, have their best friends on Facebook or Orkut. They come from the long tail world of endless, special, personal possibilities. So, the college, the classes, the tutorial batches are suddenly very alien to them. The only way education can become meaningful to today’s learners is by connecting back with life.

So, at one end, I hear the teachers complaining that students were texting or checking emails on their mobile while the class was on. I sat in school board meeting to decide whether students should be expelled from the class for using Facebook during the sessions. At the extreme end, there are complaints of abuse, disrespect, physical violence against the teachers. While this may be symptom of wider social dysfunction in some cases, these are also indicators that the education does not seem to be delivering value.

So, privatise! This is the modern perspective to solve the education problem. Privatize the whole system and watch the magic: suddenly, new shiny computers will transform the classroom and make it fun place. Modern, ready for Facebook generation. But most efforts in privatisation has not changed the system, they merely tried to improve it. The traditional value chain model was retained. The choice declined, with demands for more profitable courses crowding out the niche ones. The whole system resembled more like factory, with greater focus on process efficiencies.

But an alternative model of education is quietly emerging. This is model, which one would call Facilitated User Network. This is different from Value Chain, because, here, value does not reside in the process or the …

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